biomaterials

Injectable scaffold to heal brain damage from stroke

Stroke, the main cause of adult disability, leaves a hole, or cavity, in the brain, destroying tissue and cell networks. Physical therapy is the only approved treatment for stroke, relying on the brain’s ability to rewire itself to regain function without healing the damaged tissue. This highlights an opportunity for regenerative medicine to improve healing and long term outcomes for stroke patients. A possible solution to stroke therapy shortcomings Transplanting neural stem cells into the damaged tissue has not yet been able…

Anatomically relevant scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering

We discussed in an earlier post the application of natural polymers in clinical treatment of osteoarthritis and other injuries to articular cartilage. Those current therapies are all limited to treating small lesions or holes of only a few millimeters across. Material challenges remain when larger, curved areas of cartilage need to be regenerated in joints. Larger scaffold constructs are more difficult to evenly seed with cells, and are also prone to shrinking and changing shape as the cells grow inside…

Clinical tissue engineering for articular cartilage repair

Around 250,000 surgeries to repair articular cartilage are performed each year. Most of the damage surgeons are trying to fix begin as small lesions. Without treatment, small lesions become large holes that allow the bones of the joint to grind together. Sometimes these lesions are due to injury, but osteoarthritis is a large cause. Current Cartilage Repair If the lesion is small enough, the fix is just cleaning up the lesion by removing ragged tissue and waiting for healing to happen on…

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